Visit to National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogoliubov Institute of Theoretical Physics

Prof. Castro Neto, director of CA2DM, visited the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogoliubov Institute of Theoretical Physics, in Kiev, in March 2018, in order to establish scientific collaborations and recruit highly qualified Scientists for NUS. During this visit he met with distinguished Ukrainian Scientists such as Prof. Anton Naumovets, first Vice President of the academy. Continue Reading

CA2DM-led research team develops cost effective technique for mass production of high-quality graphene

Novel method uses 50 times less solvent than conventional methods

CA2DM-led research team have developed an economical and industrially viable strategy to produce graphene. The new technique addresses the long-standing challenge of an efficient process for large-scale production of graphene, and paves the way for sustainable synthesis of the material.

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Singapore jumped into 3rd place in the 2018 Bloomberg Innovation Index

Singapore, innovation nation.

Singapore raised 3 positions to the third position worldwide in the Bloomberg ranking in innovation thanks to its solid investment in science and technology, research and development. This result clearly shows that the government’s policies to create a truly smart nation is paying off. If this state of affairs is maintained it can lead eventually to a situation when Singapore’s high tech industrial park will drive the economy as a whole and add to Singapore’s traditional strength in commerce and trade, making it less vulnerable to fluctuations in the world economy with the creation of more highly skilled jobs with higher salaries and opportunities for its population.

– Professor Antonio Castro Neto

Read full news here:
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-01-22/south-korea-tops-global-innovation-ranking-again-as-u-s-falls

Carlsberg’s Sustainability Program

Carlsberg, one the largest brewer companies in the world and famous for a longstanding historical commitment to research and development, is launching an exciting and ambitious program on sustainability. CA2DM is proud to support this program as it reflects CA2DM’s philosophy of developing eco-friendly breakthrough technology with graphene and 2D materials. If you are interested in doing research in this important and exciting area of technology, please, check: https://career2.successfactors.eu/sfcareer/jobreqcareerpvt?jobId=661&company=carlsbergg&username=&st=381120FF99B18D08C374554209F6DD1934CD036F

CA2DM Director among world’s most impactful researchers 2017

Thirteen NUS researchers have been named among the world’s most highly cited, based on Clarivate Analytics’ 2017 Highly Cited Researchers report released on 15 November. This is also the fourth consecutive year NUS has fielded the most number of highly cited researchers among research institutions in Singapore.

Clarivate Analytics’ citation analysis has shown that these researchers consistently win peer approval from around the globe for their remarkable research in their respective fields, including chemistry, computer science, engineering, materials science, mathematics, physics, psychology and social sciences.  This was determined by the extent their papers have supported, influenced, inspired and challenged other researchers internationally.

Professor Ho Teck Hua, NUS Deputy President (Research & Technology) and Tan Chin Tuan Centennial Professor, said that the University is proud of the achievements of the 13 NUS researchers that have helped raise Singapore’s global standing in research excellence, adding that it is a strong recognition of the University’s broad base of research capabilities.

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Research team led by NUS scientists breaks new ground in memory technology

Novel organic thin film significantly outperforms existing flash memory devices

An international research team led by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) pioneered the development of a novel thin, organic film that supports a million more times read-write cycles and consumes 1,000 times less power than commercial flash memories.

The novel organic film can store and process data for 1 trillion cycles and has the potential to be made even smaller than its current size of 60 square nanometers, with potential to be sub-25 square nanometres.

“The novel properties of our invention opens up a new field in the design and development of flexible and lightweight devices. Our work shifts the paradigm on how the industry has traditionally viewed organic electronics, and expands the application of such technologies into new territories,” said Professor T Venky Venkatesan, Director of NUS Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Institute (NUSNNI), the overall coordinator for this groundbreaking project.

The invention of this novel memory device was first reported online in the journal Nature Materials on 23 October 2017.
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Novel “converter” invented by NUS scientists heralds breakthrough in ultra-fast data processing at nanoscale

Invention bagged four patents and could potentially make microprocessor chips work 1,000 times faster

Advancement in nanoelectronics, which is the use of nanotechnology in electronic components, has been fueled by the ever-increasing need to shrink the size of electronic devices in a bid to produce smaller, faster and smarter gadgets such as computers, memory storage devices, displays and medical diagnostic tools.

While most advanced electronic devices are powered by photonics – which involves the use of photons to transmit information – photonic elements are usually large in size and this greatly limits their use in many advanced nanoelectronics systems.

Plasmons, which are waves of electrons that move along the surface of a metal after it is struck by photons, holds great promise for disruptive technologies in nanoelectronics. They are comparable to photons in terms of speed (they also travel with the speed of light), and they are much smaller. This unique property of plasmons makes them ideal for integration with nanoelectronics.

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Space, the final frontier for Graphene and 2D Materials

Several years ago Prof. Castro Neto predicted the importance of graphene and other 2D materials on space technology and exploration: “In the space business weight is a big issue from the financial and physical perspectives. The heavier the payload the higher the cost of launching rockets and accelerating them into higher speeds. Graphene and 2D materials are the lightest functional materials in the universe and hence are perfect in terms of mass density”, says Prof. Castro Neto, “and, moreover, in the absence of air and water, 2D materials never corrode and can last indefinitely.”  Prof. Castro Neto goes further “In deep space the temperatures are so low that some 2D materials superconduct reducing the energy cost of operation to a perfect zero.”

Prof Castro Neto’s dreams of making graphene a big player in the space race are becoming reality. In collaboration with Boreal Space, a US based satellite launcher, CA2DM is soon launching the first graphene devices into orbit opening a new chapter in space exploration for 2D materials.

Find out more of this exciting news here.