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Updated: 22 min 28 sec ago

Versarien to supply graphene to the CPI

Tue, 19/09/2017 - 5:57pm

The advanced materials engineering group Versarien announced that it has won a tender for the ongoing supply of nanomaterials to the Centre for Process Innovation. Versarien will supply up to 1.2 kilograms of graphene in a variety of forms to the CPI, in addition to hexagonal layer boron nitride.

Neill Ricketts, chief executive of Versarien, said: "We are very pleased to have been successful in all the tenders we entered into to supply the CPI with our nanomaterials after a competitive process". "For Versarien this is an important route for the commercialization of products enhanced by graphene and other related materials", "We continue to receive record levels of enquires from potential purchasers of our products globally and look forward to making further announcements as appropriate," Ricketts said.

Grolltex raises $600,000 in recent financing Round

Mon, 18/09/2017 - 6:52pm

Grolltex, a U.S-based graphene materials and products developer, recently closed an Internal Seed B round of financing, amounting to $600,000. The round was entirely filled by existing shareholders at a valuation of $10 Million.

The company stated that it will use the funds to improve productivity as well as for general corporate purposes. Grolltex uses patented research and technologies developed at the University of California, San Diego, to produce CVD graphene as well as develop products made of graphene.

Graphene-based water filtration project progresses and receives funding boost

Mon, 18/09/2017 - 6:04pm

The Smart Filter project received new Innovate UK funding that follows a previous £700,000 project grant awarded in 2015. The previous grant enabled a two-year project by G2O and the Centre for Process Innovation (CPI), focused on transferring and scaling up the water filtration technology from laboratory to industry, ensuring the technology is usable with full quality control.

The technology has since been validated at CPI and the new grant will focus on transferring it to large-scale manufacturing. That will include the use of industrial printing technology to manufacture membranes and validate their performance using prototypes and will involve collaboration with a number of UK partner organizations including chemicals manufacturer William Blythe and CPI.

Graphene-wrapped nanocrystals may open door toward next-gen fuel cells

Mon, 18/09/2017 - 5:06pm

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a mix of metal nanocrystals wrapped in graphene that may open the door to the creation of a new type of fuel cell by enabling enhanced hydrogen storage properties.

ultrathin oxide layer (oxygen atoms shown in red) coating graphene-wrapped magnesium nanoparticles (orange) still allows in hydrogen atoms (blue) for hydrogen storage applications

The team studied how graphene can be used as both selective shielding, as well as a performance increasing factor in terms of hydrogen storage. The study drew upon a range of Lab expertise and capabilities to synthesize and coat the magnesium crystals, which measure only 3-4 nanometers (billionths of a meter) across; study their nanoscale chemical composition with X-rays; and develop computer simulations and supporting theories to better understand how the crystals and their carbon coating function together.

Graphene helps improve bio-compatibility of scaffolds, to promote neuron growth

Wed, 13/09/2017 - 8:17pm

A team of Researchers from Spain and Italy have created a series of 3D hydrogel scaffolds for neuronal growth using a combination of aqueous graphene dispersions and acrylamide synthesized by in situ radical polymerization.

While this is not the first time acrylamide hydrogels have been synthesized for scaffold applications, they have commonly suffered from biocompatibility issues – a crucial flaw when it comes to implantable scaffolds. To address this issue, the researchers created a series of graphene-polyacrylamide hydrogels which support the growth of living primary neurons.

Spray-on graphene-based coating for improved desalination membranes

Wed, 13/09/2017 - 8:01pm

An international group of researchers, including scientists from Shinshu University in Japan and Penn State’s ATOMIC Center, created a graphene and graphene oxide-based coating for desalination membranes which are said to be more scalable and sturdier than current nanofiltration membrane technologies available.

The result of this creation would hopefully be a filter for clean water solutions, protein separation, wastewater treatment, as well as pharmaceutical and food industry applications. This membrane uses a simple spray-on technology to coat a mixture of graphene oxide and graphene in solution onto a backbone support membrane of polysulfone that is modified with polyvinyl alcohol. The team reports that even in the early stages of the development of the membrane, it can already reject 85% of salt, which is sufficient for agricultural purposes, and 96% of dye molecules.

Graphene-enhanced fluid improves solar collectors' efficiency

Wed, 13/09/2017 - 7:07pm

Researchers at the University of Lisbon's Centro de Química Estrutural have discovered that the addition of graphene to the working fluid of solar collectors helps to regain some of its lost efficiency. Solar thermal collectors are seen as a simple and inexpensive way to make use of solar energy. Pure water is an efficient heat-transfer fluid, but it must be mixed with antifreeze to prevent damage to pipes during freezing conditions, and this lowers its performance.

The properties of an ideal heat-transfer fluid in a solar collector include a high thermal capacity and a freezing point outside of the temperature range likely to be encountered. Unfortunately, in the case of water, satisfying the latter requirement means compromising on the former, as mixing water with antifreeze makes it a less effective carrier of heat.

Graphene Flagship team designs graphene-based terahertz absorbers

Wed, 13/09/2017 - 4:27pm

Researchers from CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Italy and the University of Cambridge, UK, associated with the ​Graphene Flagship, have shown that it is possible to create a terahertz saturable absorber using graphene, produced by liquid phase exfoliation and deposited by transfer coating and ink jet printing. The paper reports a terahertz saturable absorber with an order of magnitude higher absorption modulation than other devices produced to date.

A terahertz saturable absorber decreases its absorption of light in the terahertz range (far infrared) with increasing light intensity and has great potential for the development of terahertz lasers, with applications in spectroscopy and imaging. These high-modulation, mode-locked lasers open up many prospects in applications where short time scale excitation of specific transitions are important, such as time-resolved spectroscopy of gasses and molecules, quantum information or ultra-high speed communication.

Talga Resources' CEO: 2017 will be a turning point for graphene commercialization

Tue, 12/09/2017 - 3:40pm

Australia-based technology minerals company, Talga Resources, is actively developing graphene materials and graphene-based applications across many areas, including coatings, batteries, construction materials, composites and more.

Mark Thompson, Talga's managing director, was kind enough to update us on Talga's graphene program and answer a few questions we had.

Q: Thank you for this interview, Mark. Can you quickly update us on your graphite mine operation in Sweden?

Talga has over 20 years of graphite mining potential outlined in economic studies to date and currently extracts intermittently what it needs for scale up and testing purposes. Talga mined approximately 5,000 tonnes of graphite ore during 2015-16 trial mining operations. Further extraction is not required for now but permitting for the future larger scale operations is underway.

NanoXplore finalized its RTO with Graniz Mondal and is now a public company

Mon, 11/09/2017 - 9:39pm

In June 2017 Group NanoXplore, a Montreal-based company specializing in the production and application of graphene and its derivative materials, announced that it will merge with Graniz Modal, a public company that trades in the Canadian stock exchange (TSX: GRA.H) - to become a public company.

NanoXplore has now completed the deal, and is now trading in the TSX Venture under the ticker CVE:GRA. NanoXplore has a market capitalization of $36.3 million CAD, and Mason Graphite now holds 25% of the company. As part of the reverse merger, NanoXplore raised $9.7 million CAD.

Ionic Industries announces a process for economically mass-producing graphene micro supercapacitors

Mon, 11/09/2017 - 4:04pm

Ionic Industries recently announced a process for economically mass-producing graphene micro supercapacitors and added that the its directors and key personnel have taken direct stakes in the company.

Ionic stated that since it published the positive results on its graphene micro planar supercapacitors 2 years before, the company has been working toward developing a device that not only demonstrates similar performance but can be produced at scale to deliver an economically viable device.

Dotz Nano develops a process to use graphene quantum dots for fuel authentication

Mon, 11/09/2017 - 2:35pm

Dotz Nano has announced the successful development of a process to tag fuel derivatives with graphene quantum dots (GQDs). The technology allows GQDs to be optimally added to fuel derivatives via a patent pending method so that the GQDs cannot be easily "laundered" or "washed out" from the fuel.

The new fuel application has been said to successfully withstand various testing procedures used in international bids for fuel taggants. This was achieved by working closely with two international anti-counterfeiting/brand protection companies. Dotz Nano has also submitted a patent application on the specific tagging of fuels with GQDs.

Swinburne University and IIM announce graphene smart composites project

Mon, 11/09/2017 - 2:17pm

Imagine Intelligent Materials and Swinburne University have announced a collaborative six-month project aiming to develop graphene-reinforced smart composites. The composite will be able to report on the condition of large structures, and will have major commercial potential in the transport sector, including automotive and aerospace.

The project is supported by a $20,000 Seed grant from the university under a program, targeting “interdisciplinary projects that are aligned with the Swinburne research institutes’ external partnership and collaboration objectives”. It will combine expertise from experts in sensors, electronics engineering and aerospace manufacturing at the university.

Haydale announces proposed collaboration with Rogers Advanced Composites

Wed, 06/09/2017 - 3:29pm

Haydale recently announced that it has agreed heads of terms for a technical and commercial collaboration with Rogers Advanced Composites ("RAC”). RAC is developing a composites center in the UK, and this collaboration will aim to enable RAC to access Haydale’s extensive technical know-how in composites, polymers and resins and to incorporate the range of advanced graphene enhanced composites, developed by Haydale, into its existing and future projects.

RAC, which has roots in the marine and yachting world through its sister company Rogers Yacht Design, has built a strong reputation in the design and manufacture of advanced composite products. It is Haydale’s understanding that RAC is experiencing a strong demand for high quality composite solutions across a range of industrial sectors including marine, military and motor sport and that RAC is in the process of securing long term production contracts for an oil recovery project as well as several aerospace, military and motor racing projects.

Graphene takes part in $4.4 million international initiative for early diagnosis of brain cancer

Tue, 05/09/2017 - 1:35pm

The European Commission recently awarded nearly €3.7 million ($4.4 million USD) to an international initiative in the field of early diagnosis of brain cancer. The four-year program, which will be led by Plymouth University, is called An Integrated Platform for Developing Brain Cancer Diagnostic Techniques, or AiPBAND. It will focus on gliomas with specific objectives to identify new blood biomarkers for the disease, design plasmonic-based, graphene-based, and digital ELISA assay-based multiplex biosensors; and to develop a big data-empowered intelligent data management infrastructure and cloud-based diagnostic systems.

Through the initiative, which also includes partner organizations from China, an estimated 14 research fellows will be trained by academic and private sector experts from participating organizations in fields including neuroscience, engineering, healthcare, and economics. Individual research projects under the nonprofit Vitae Researcher Development Framework will be arranged into local training courses, network-wide events, secondments, and personalized career development plans with private sector involvement, according to Plymouth University.

NSF grant to fund development of inkjet-printed graphene-based water quality sensors

Mon, 04/09/2017 - 4:24pm

The National Science Foundation recently awarded University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee scientists $1.5 million to perfect a method of mass-producing graphene-based small water sensors using inkjet printing. The goal is to determine whether the process can be customized in order to scale up production and in a more economic way than traditional manufacturing methods.

The graphene-based sensors, developed at UWM, reportedly outperform current technologies in accuracy, sensitivity and sensing speed. Their performance and size make them useful for continuously monitoring drinking water for miniscule traces of contaminants like lead.

Graphene enables detection of single photons

Mon, 04/09/2017 - 3:28pm

A team of researchers led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Raytheon BBN Technologies developed a new device that can detect single photons across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the higher energy visible to much lower energy radio frequencies. The device consists of a sheet of graphene contacted on two ends by superconductors - a configuration called a Josephson junction.

The ability to detect terahertz and microwave photons in this way could allow for observations of some of the faintest objects in the universe, say the researchers who report on the new technique, “as well as open up new opportunities in quantum information processing.”

Theragnostic Technologies receives grant to expand its graphene-based contrast agent platform to X-Ray CT procedures

Sun, 03/09/2017 - 5:39pm

In 2012, researchers from Stony Brook University established Theragnostic Technologies to develop a new efficient and cost-effective graphene-based MRI contrast agent. In 2015 Theragnostic launched the product, called ManGraDex, which needs several of years of clinical trials before it can be commercialized (the company aims for 2022 or 2023).

Theragnostic Technologies now announced that it has received a new SBIR phase-1 grant from the NIH to extend the ManGraDex platform for use in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. The company will demonstrate the preclinical safety and efficacy of a novel graphene-enhanced CT contrast agent for imaging and monitoring in patients with renal failure or at risk of contrast induced nephropathy.

Graphene 3D Lab secures $432,000 in non-public placement

Sun, 03/09/2017 - 5:25pm

Graphene 3D Lab recently announced that it has opened and closed a personal placement of Frequent Shares.

G3L secured $432,000 which it intends to use for common working capital functions and analysis and growth actions.

Connecticut team designs a unique process for exfoliating graphene

Thu, 31/08/2017 - 4:52pm

Researchers at the University of Connecticut, assisted by ones from the University of Akron, have patented a unique process for exfoliating graphene, as well as manufacturing innovative graphene nanocomposites that have potential uses in a variety of applications.

The new process doesn’t require any additional steps or chemicals to produce graphene in its pristine form. “The innovation and technology behind our material is our ability to use a thermodynamically driven approach to un-stack graphite into its constituent graphene sheets, and then arrange those sheets into a continuous, electrically conductive, three-dimensional structure” says the lead scientist in the study. “The simplicity of our approach is in stark contrast to current techniques used to exfoliate graphite that rely on aggressive oxidation or high-energy mixing or sonication – the application of sound energy to separate particles – for extended periods of time. As straightforward as our process is, no one else had reported it. We proved it works”.

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